Supported by

Improved Farming Systems

What we do:

The Improved Farming Systems Program is farmer-focused, and carries out disease management research that is directly adoptable by the grower. The team works hand-in-hand with growers and the wider industry, working to develop economical integrated disease management (IDM) strategies to all fungal diseases affecting different crops within different farming systems.

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Why we do it:

Current agronomic practices for the past two decades have dramatically improved the profitability of farming systems, however, this good agronomy often contradicts good disease management, and we are seeing a steady increase in cases of fungicide resistance.

Fungicides and disease resistant crop varieties are the most favourable strategies used by growers to control disease. To help the grains industry get the best of value out of these strategies, we are helping to identify the practices that will delay development of fungicide resistance and extend their effective life. These practices must enhance profitability and sustainability so that growers can have confidence in adopting them.

In the absence of a “silver bullet” solution to managing foliar diseases, it is necessary to use a range of options that suit each farming system.  Bringing these tactical (short term) and strategic (long term) options together to reduce disease impact is called integrated disease management (IDM).

How we are using integrated disease management

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How to collaborate with our program:

We are looking to collaborate with grower groups, consultant/agronomy groups, government bodies or anyone with a vested interest in integrated disease management.

The nature of CCDM’s bilateral agreement allows us to be flexible with the rapidly changing issues of managing disease, and we encourage industry members to connect with us to help growers better manage crop disease.

Amir Abadi, Program Leader
08 9266 5679; amir.abadi@curtin.edu.au

Researchers of the program:

Amir Abadi: Program leader and economist.

Ayalsew Zerihun: Optimal fungicide timing for different varieties and environments.

Sarita Bennett: Timing of sowing and fungicide use in pulses.

Deborah Pritchard: Factors triggering germination of sclerotia.

Pippa Michael: Green bridges, evaluating its application for pathogen surveillance.

Leon Hodgson: Stubble management to reduce the disease load.

King Yin Lui: IDM decision guide development.